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Bone Broth Recipe

Bone Broth Recipe

A simple basic bone broth recipe is all one needs to increase the collagen and nutrients so plentiful in a properly prepared broth. There is no magic to this and certainly no mystery. Bone broth has been used for more years than most of us think. Yes, it has quite a history. It is SO easy to make and my Basic Bone Broth 101 recipe is below for you.

In Chinese medicine, dating back over 2,500 years, bone broth was and is used to support digestive health, to strengthen the kidneys and blood. In the early 12th century Egypt, physician Moses Maimonides was known to prescribe chicken soup as a medicinal remedy for colds and asthma. He was a revered Jewish philosopher and a rabbi so maybe that’s one reason chicken soup has been a part of traditional Jewish kitchens for generations. It carries the nickname “Jewish Penicillin” due to its anti-inflammatory benefits and remedies for cold and flu symptoms. So, as you can see this idea of bone broth is nothing new, is not a fad and nor is the Paleo diet. 🙂

Many groups, tribes and cultures have nourished their families with bone broths and/or stocks throughout history and we have much to learn from them as you can see. It simply takes reading and research and not becoming lazy with the comforts of packaged food in our aisles. Heaven forbid what these wonderful individuals would think of our society now.

bone broth recipe 1

So these days, while grass-fed beef is the meat most people associate with bone broth, it can also be made with lamb, pork, chicken, veal… you name it. A word about these wonderful, collagen-heavy bones: they make for a stock that’s gelatinous at room temperature. Don’t let texture alarm you; it’s a sign you did it the correct way. Bravo!

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Bone Broth Recipe

Cook/Baker:
A simple basic bone broth recipe is all one needs to get rolling on increasing the collagen and nutrients so plentiful in a properly prepared broth. There is no magic to this and certainly no mystery. Bone broth has been used for more years than most of us think. Yes, it has quite a history. A word about these wonderful, collagen-heavy bones: they make for a stock that's gelatinous at room temperature. Don't let texture alarm you; it’s a sign you did it the correct way. Bravo!

Ingredients

  • Grass-fed beef, chicken or other healthy animal bones
  • 1 tablespoon vinegar - apple cider, preferably
  • Enough purified water to cover the bones in a crock pot (my favorite)

Instructions

  1. Place the bones in your crockpot or pot of choice and cover with water and vinegar.
  2. The bones must be cooked at a very low temperature for quite some time.
  3. Set your crock pot to low and cook for 14-20 hours.
  4. Or simmer over low heat for up to 24 hours on a stove top – sometimes longer.
  5. The longer the simmering, the more gelatin is produced from the collagen-laden joints and the release of trace minerals found in the bones.
  6. Remove the bones and small scraps of broken bones.
  7. Enjoy any little bits of meat that fall off or can be pulled off the bones.
  8. Enjoy the marrow on a plate if you have some!
  9. Drink in a cup or soup bowl, or learn how to use your broth in other recipes.
  10. Salt if you wish.
  11. Keep covered and refrigerated.
  12. The gelatin will gel and harden only when cooled/chilled.
  13. Enjoy!
Notes
For this recipe stick to purchasing animal knuckles and thick leg bones, as the knuckles contain more cartilage and collagen. You want bones that have marrow in them, ones that are considered ideal soup bones. If you mix and match animal bones, you’ll alter the flavor. I feel it is best to stick with one animal per bone broth.

You add vinegar to the recipe, as it helps to leach out the minerals from the bones. Apple cider is ideal; white vinegar will leave behind a harsh flavor.

From my kitchen to yours,

Tina Turbin

About Tina Turbin

I'm a cookbook-collecting, recipe-developing paleo junkie, and I live in the kitchen. I'm hooked on farmers' markets, traveling, eating healthy, and hiking until my legs scream at me. There's nothing better than hanging out with family and good friends. I have fun and sleeping is just plain boring. Read more About Tina Turbin.

2 thoughts on “Bone Broth Recipe

  1. Cameron

    Thank you for sharing this! I’ve been trying to make my own bone broth and it was always a failure. And for someone as busy as me, I don’t have much time making one, which is why a friend recommended Au Bon Broth. It’s surprisingly delicious and tasty like it was home-made.

    Reply
    1. Tina Turbin

      Hi Cameron,

      You’re very welcome and I’m glad this post helped you! I’m also glad you found about Au Bone Broth. They are a great company and I’ve enjoyed their products in the past.

      Fondly,
      Tina

      Reply

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